Fun Friday! Call for Makers: World Maker Faire 2018!

If you have any familiarity with the Maker Culture or the Maker Movement, you are probably familiar with Make: magazine and their incredibly successful and ever-expanding events, the Maker Faire.

Call for Makers Maker Faire

Maker Faire:  full STEAM ahead!

The Maker Faire is the coming together of fascinating, curious, eager do-it-yourselfers who embrace and pursue the creative, the inventive, the innovative, as well as sharing their enthusiasm for making and what they create.  A festival of STEAM!  From engineers to artists to scientists to crafters, Maker Faire is a venue for these “makers” to show off their hobbies, experiments, projects, passions.

The folks behind these innovative gatherings refer to Maker Faire as the Greatest Show (& Tell) on Earth – a family-friendly showcase of invention, creativity, and resourcefulness.

The first event, initiated to “celebrate arts, crafts, engineering, science projects and the Do-It-Yourself (DIY) mindset” was 12 years ago in San Mateo, California, organized by the editors of Make: magazine.  It was a hit right off the bat with over 500 booths and approximately 65,000 people through the doors.  This first Faire included a human-sized Mouse Trap board game, kinetic squid sculpture, 55′ wingspan kinetic steel butterfly, bicycle-powered music stage, and a solar-powered chariot pulled by an Arnold Schwarzenegger robot.  From this single venue back in 2006, there are now over 225 Maker Faires in 38 countries around the world, reaching over 1.5 million people first-hand!

If you’re interested in participating in the big leagues, the 9th Annual World Maker Faire in New York has put out their call for Makers and Do-It-Yourselfers!  The perfect opportunity to present your amazing, creative and/or innovative DIY efforts, regardless your age, to an appreciative audience.

Can’t make it to New York City?  No worries!  If you’d like to experience the Maker Faire closer to home, check out the 4th Annual Mini Maker Faire this fall in Prince George.

Taking place Saturday, September 22nd, this is a day of Show and Tell that combines elements of science fair, craft fair and inventions!  If you’re interested in participating, the CALL FOR MAKERS is now on!

If you’d simply like to see and enjoy local creativity, invention, and innovation, admission is free to see the many local Makers showcasing a range of tech projects, artwork, soap making, textile and fibre work, Lego construction, woodworking and more.

Wondering how to bring a Maker Faire to your community?  While they can be quite grand, despite the size of these larger MF events, they are possible at almost any scale.  The Mini Maker Faire program provides tools and resources to help produce an exceptional event that reflects the creativity, spirit and ingenuity of your community. The K-12 School program provides a similar experience scaled for a school community.

In its simplest form, Maker Faire creates opportunities for conversations with Makers. Tech enthusiasts, crafters, educators, tinkerers, hobbyists, engineers, science clubs, authors, artists, students, and entrepreneurs all come together to show their projects and to talk about what they have learned. It is a community-based learning event that inspires everyone to become a maker, and connect with people and projects in their local community.

It is a special experience, but the fundamental design of the event is one that can be reproduced almost anywhere. Mini Maker Faires are independently produced celebrations of local maker culture and the licensing program is available to interested organizations and individuals after successfully satisfying the application process.

Mini Maker Faires are independently produced celebrations of local maker culture. Our city-facing Mini Maker Faire program provides tools and resources to help others to make a Maker Faire event that reflects the creativity, spirit and ingenuity of their community. There is also the K-12 School Maker Faire program providing a similar experience scaled for a school community.

#LearnCreateLaunch #madeatMIDAS #makersgonnamake

 

 

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Fun Friday: DIY 3D Printed Fidget Spinner

DIY 3D printed fidget spinner

Despite being on trend for the past several years, Fidget Spinners are everywhere!  This little gadget of mindless distraction is likely the single most 3D printed item, and very simple in design, so it’s understandable why makers, young and old, are eager to design their own version.

This is a great 3D printing project because it will provide you all there is to know about the mechanics of fidget spinners and how to create your 3D printable file.

DIY 3D printed Fidget Spinner

The Fidget Spinner is a simple project that uses three 3D-printed parts and a bearing from McMaster-Carr. Learn how to use the McMaster-Carr part browser, basic 3D modeling, and how to make mechanical joints.

Modelling demo and files:  If you’re unfamiliar with Fusion 360, here’s a handy 3D Printing Class to get crash course in using the program.  The application is free to students and hobbyists, so there’s plenty to be had for educational support as you get to know it.

This is a fun and pretty easy project, and if you follow the complete instructions, which includes instructional webinars and video, totally do-able for the beginner maker.

3D design and printing truly allows just about anyone access to fabrication and prototyping with relative ease.  If you’re interested in learning the basics in design, 3D printing and fabrication, be sure to check out all of the cool courses we have on offer.

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Fun Friday! Easy & Fun Beginner Maker Ed Projects

banana apple makeymakey DIY beginner maker projects

Maker Ed, or Maker Education, is a new school of educational thought that focuses on delivering constructivist, project-based learning curriculum and instruction to students. As the Maker Movement begins to make inroads into conventional education, maker education spaces are geared to facilitating hands-on learning experiences that incorporate both low and high tech, and can be as large as full high school workshops with high-tech tools, or as small and low-tech as one corner of an elementary classroom.

Maker Ed is particularly effective when leveraging the balance between exploration and execution. Small projects lend themselves to indefinite tinkering and fiddling, while larger projects need complex, coordinated planning. Often, small projects can organically grow into larger and larger projects. This deliberate process strengthens and enriches a learner’s executive functioning skills.

Effective Maker Ed isn’t just about the tools and technology.  Communication and collaboration are two of Maker Ed’s fundamental values. Making allows learners to practice their social communication skills in a variety of ways:  Affinity-based, where students organize themselves in real world and/or Internet (or virtual) to learn something connected to a shared endeavor, interest, or passion; role-specific, where the learning is customized dependent upon the specific tasks and function of the project and the training is presented in the context of a specific role ands what it takes to perform that role; or, teacher-assigned, where the educator facilitates more directly assigning each student to a particular task in the project.  It’s important for all different groups to be present in student learning spaces so that all students can practice their social skills in multiple settings.

Additionally, making offers unique opportunities to generate flow learning, an optimal psychological state that students experience when engaged in an activity that is appropriately challenging to their individual skill levels while encouraging immersion and concentrated focus on a task. Flow learning allows for deeper learning experiences as well as higher levels of personal and work satisfaction where the teacher is better able to leverage high-interest projects and activities and turn them into learning objectives within a curriculum.

Ultimately, we are talking about collaboration and learning through doing.  Maker education provides the space for real-life collaboration, integration across multiple disciplines, and iteration—the opportunity to fail, rework a project and find success.

We at MIDAS are fully committed to supporting the efforts of educators and makers looking to promote a cooperative learning environment where collaboration and education work hand-in-hand encouraging innovation in the most fun and organic ways possible.

New to the Maker Culture and education?  Here are a few fun and easy suggestions to get things going with the young – or old – aspiring makers in your life:

Smaller Scale Maker Ed Projects

Do you want to get into Making and Maker Ed but don’t know where to start? No problem! Here are nine class-tested, teacher-approved ideas, which can be built using a few tools for K–8 students.

tower of power beginner maker projectTowers of Power

Materials:  Paper, Scotch tape.

Tools: Scissors.

A great starting point for a beginning Maker teacher, this “Towers of Power” activity allows students to build towers out of paper and Scotch tape.

Students can build the tallest tower with an unlimited amount of materials, constrain themselves to limited materials or introduce new materials, such as straws and paper clips.

Once it’s complete, have fun crushing the tower with textbooks! Find out which tower holds up the most weight.

This group activity can help students with teamwork, leadership and planning skills. Best of all, variations on this theme are endless — and the materials can be found in any home or office.

simple catapult beginner maker projectCatapults

Materials:  Mouse traps, wood stirring sticks, erasers, wood blocks, ping-pong balls. hot glue.

Tools: a hot glue gun.

 

Introducing elements of STEM, this catapult activity is a favourite project to introduce engineering principles, motion and fun. The catapult allows students to chase down the best launching angle and the ratio between power and arm length, as well as discuss projectile motion, gravity, physics laws and a whole host of other things.

Plus, every student likes trying to smash something apart with a teacher’s permission.

Little hands might pinch themselves handling the strong lever, so it’s good practice to disengage the spring for students while they make their catapults.

Design Challenge Projects

Terrific exercises in STEAM!  And a great way to get into making is to give you and your students a few hours to explore the Making design process. Design challenges are a great way to get this done.

Set a hard time limit, test the devices, take time to evaluate and reflect.

Bridge to Nowhere beginner maker projectBridge to Nowhere

Materials:  Wood craft sticks, hot glue, 5-gallon bucket with weights.

Tools:  Hot glue gun,  diagonal cutters.

Design a bridge to span a foot-long gap and hold as much weight as possible.

An extension could be to build a cantilever — a bridge with only one footing.

Use a set amount of craft sticks or materials in order to encourage creativity in solutions.

Float the Boat

 beginner maker projectFloat the Boat

Materials:  Tinfoil, craft sticks, bamboo skewers, paper, hot glue, clay, wood scraps, pens and markers.

Tools:  Scissors, hot glue guns, craft sticks.

Design a boat that can hold the most cargo, move through the water the fastest, or has the most efficient weight to cargo ratio.

Find the best shape for sails, design the fastest hull and find the balance point.

Egg Drop beginner maker STEM projectEgg Drop

Materials:  Cardboard boxes, packing tape, junk and stuff (the weirder, the better). Think packing materials, fabric scraps, string, rope, plastic bags, etc.

Tools:  Scissors.

Some serious STEM fun!

Throwing eggs off something high always gets kids motivated.

It’s a great way to discuss momentum and illustrate why you should always wear your seat belt!

Beginner Maker projects DIY musical instrumentsInstruments


Materials:  Wood scraps, strings, dried rice, beans, sandpaper, cardboard, cardboard boxes, paper rolls, hot glue, tape, small sections of pipe, etc.

Tools:  Hot glue gun, scissors, hole punch, awl.

If a teacher offers a student the opportunity to make something joyfully noisy, they usually take it.

Homemade, DIY, maker instruments come in all different sizes and types — from wood drums to coffee can shakers, to wind chimes to xylophones, it just takes a bit of a Google search to find great ideas.

Electricity

Once you—parent, teacher, facilitator —get your “legs” for developing and encouraging Maker projects, why not expand your skills?

By now you’ve seen what you and what your kids can do. You’ve probably worked out how to efficiently manage the classroom and supplies, and document learning. Kick it up a level consider some more advanced projects incorporating electricity.

Electromagnetic beginner maker STEM projectElectromagnets



Materials:  Metal bolts, nails, copper wire, batteries.Tools:  Pliers, scissors or wire snips.

Electromagnets illustrate the connection between electricity and magnetism.

In real life, electromagnets are the cornerstone of many common electrical devices, such as door bells, burglar alarms, car doors and electric motors. Students can fiddle with them to create small toys that can pick up ferrous objects.

Squishy Circuits DIY beginner maker projectsSquishy Circuits

Materials:  Battery holder – 4XAA Batteries w/ Switch, (4) AA Batteries, LED – 5mm or 10mm Jumbo, Conductive Dough, Insulating Dough.

Tools:  Hot plate, or stove, and pots, wire snips or scissors.

Squishy circuits are a fun way to learn and explore the basics of electricity and electrical circuits and they solve one of the biggest conundrums with younger Makers: how to build with real electronic components when the young hands have yet to develop the fine motor skills to connect relatively small parts together via grown up tools?

Play dough! Take a piece of flour and a small collection of electronic parts (which you can find online at a low cost.)

You can get all the deets for this project HERE.

banana apple makeymakey DIY beginner maker projectsArduino, Raspberry Pi, MakeyMakey Controller Boards

Materials:

Anything you can get your hands on:   Tinfoil, wires

Tools:  Pliers, scissors, Arduino, Raspberry Pi, MakeyMakey

Once the students have made a few electronic circuits, they might ask for something a bit more complicated.

Give them a programmable microcontroller board, which they can use to play a banana piano, design a custom video game controller or create a dance floor that can play different songs with each tile.

Check out these great microcontroller projects HERE!

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Fun Friday: Highlights From the West Kootenay & Boundary Regional Science Fair 2018

West Kootenay Boundary Regional Science fair recipient accepting MIDAS prize!

It was another great day spent with young innovators this past weekend at the West Kootenay & Boundary Regional Science Fair 2018!  An inspirational day seeing what approximately 200 local students from around the region are showcasing in science experiments, studies, and research & innovation projects.

There is so much to be gained for these young participants through the Science Fair experience:  research skills, problem solving, thinking scientifically, public speaking and connecting with other participants, sharing ideas and process.

We were there in full force to help celebrate the incredible ideas, skill and talent while sharing the innovative possibilities available through the MIDAS Fab Lab.

MIDAS Lab Director was so pleased to present the MIDAS Innovation Award to student Dylan Peil for his fabulous BioMechanical Arm:  4 hours Custom Training at MIDAS at a value of $600.

MIDAS Innovation Award winner for Mechanical Arm


It was a celebration of local innovation and MIDAS & KAST were there to offer plenty of information about what goes on here in the Fab Lab.

And check this out…. in the spirit of all the fun of the Science Fair, a bit of a twist on MONOPOLY:  MIDASOPOLY!  3D printing at it’s most fun!

3D printed MIDASOPOLY

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Fun Friday: West Kootenay & Boundary Regional Science Fair 2018 This Weekend!

Selkirk College Regional Science Fair

This is the weekend!  If you want to see some incredible local youth innovation make sure you add the West Kootenay & Boundary Regional Science Fair to your weekend’s activities.  Hosted by GLOWS and Selkirk College, the event takes place tomorrow, April 14th 11:00AM to 4:00PM at the Selkirk College Castlegar Campus Gymnasium.

This ever-growing event offers students from around the region a fun opportunity to showcase their science experiments, studies, research or innovation projects; judged by our committed volunteers from a variety of science professions.

More than 100 youth are selected at the school level to enter in the annual West Kootenay & Boundary Regional Science Fair.

Admittance is free and everyone is welcome!  We’ll look forward to seeing you there!

Meantime, here’s a little fun inspiration – 10 unique 1st place ideas just for kicks or to help offer ideas as you make plans for next year!

Schedule of Events

9 – 11 am  ––  Science Fair Projects – Judging (student projects are closed to the public/parents at this time)

9:30 – 4 pm ––   Popsicle Stick Bridge Building Contest – Testing will be ongoing throughout the day

11 – 4 pm ––  Community Science Celebration – Science World, Selkirk College and other community organizations will have exciting science-based activities, demo’s and displays set up around the gym.

11 am  ––  Science World Main Stage Show

11:30 am – 1 pm –– Science Fair Projects: Open To The Public

12:00 pm –– Science World Main Stage Show

1 pm –– Science Fair Awards Ceremony – Main Stage

2pm  –– Science World Main Stage Show

3 pm –– Science World Main Stage Show

Learn more about GLOWS at Selkirk College and follow GLOWS on Facebook.

This year, the West Kootenay & Boundary Regional Science Fair is excited to welcome Science World’s Community Science Celebration.

Science World is a charitable organization that engages British Columbians in science and inspires future science and technology leadership throughout our province. Attend the Regional Science Fair and discover the science all around you with Science World’s Community Science Celebration! Fun and entertaining science experiments, displays and demos and science experts on scene will make this a fun event for the entire family.

 

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The Maker Movement: DIY, Hands-on, Innovation In Action!

maker movement fostered at MIDAS

There is a movement afoot and, with the help of education, tools and equipment (such as welcomes you at MIDAS!) to more easily and cost-efficiently bring ideas to life, it’s gaining tremendous steam!

The Maker Movement – or in more familiar terms, Do-It-Yourself – is growing in participation in schools, communities and industry throughout the province, and, of course, beyond.  What makes this a movement, rather than simply the act of puttering in one’s garage, is the resources, equipment and materials available to support it in ways we’ve never seen before.

This movement is grassroots innovation and it’s being enthusiastically embraced and fostered in more and more communities, nurturing an ever growing number of people, creative and curious.

The digital age has really blown the lid off what was formerly tinkering, or on a larger scale, inventing and innovating with significant effort and resources to bring an idea to prototype, using specific manufacturers located by and large overseas.  Inventing and innovating, as it has previously been known, has required very specialized software and fabrication equipment, not easily accessible either in terms of cost or location and has made it prohibitive for potential innovators to see a project through to completion let alone market.

With technology expanding as it is, so fast and with such scope, the creative process of invention and innovation is being transformed.  The access we have to imaging, scanning, drafting and other specialized software as well as the fabrication equipment to translate plans into tangible, surprisingly high quality, prototypes allows and encourages Maker creativity and invention unlike any time before.

MIDAS, and our MIT certified facilities, is a great example.  As part of this movement gathering momentum, every day we see makers contributing to what is becoming their own market ecosystem, developing incredible new products and services. The combination of ingenious makers and innovative technologies such as the Raspberry Pi mini-computer and Arduino micro-controller along with 3D printing are driving innovation in manufacturing, engineering, industrial design, hardware technology and education.

Makerspaces are cropping up in communities big and small. Offering everything from Repair Cafes – where makers offer up their talents to fix and repurpose everything from computers to mobile phones to toaster ovens – to workshops on soldering and Arduino to imaging software education to actual fabrication and prototyping equipment, as we do here.

Inquiry-based and more hands-on education trends are beginning to trend as well.  Schools, for pre-schoolers through secondary students, are offering more and more resources and opportunities to explore and nurture their curiosity.  Through electronics and technology, young people are challenging their own creativity, innovating unlike ever before through coding, robotics and other fun and hands-on ways of expanding their knowledge and experience in the various facets of Science, Technology, Engineering, Art (Design), Mathematics, or STEAM.

While many makers consider themselves simply hobbyists or enthusiasts they are a vibrant and fundamental source of innovation, embracing creativity, developing new products and generating value in the Maker community.  In fact, it’s not unusual for some of these Makers to take the leap as entrepreneurs and start companies.  We see it all the time!

While there are several industry professionals who take advantage of the incredible Maker opportunities at MIDAS, it’s not necessary to be an engineer or techie to enjoy all a space like MIDAS offers.  Check out our #madeatMIDAS features to see the examples of ordinary people making extraordinary things.

That’s what’s so great about the Maker Movement: accessibility!  You don’t even need to bring an idea… just your imagination and curiosity.  The ideas will flow soon enough!

What can MIDAS can help you make!  Check out our calendar of courses HERE!

#madeatMIDAS #makersgonnamake

Introduction to MIDAS from MIDAS Fab Lab on Vimeo.

Fun Friday! Raspberry Pi DIY Laptop With A Little Trotec Laser Cutter!

 

Raspberry Pi Trotec Laser Cutter DIY laptopWhat do you get when you combine the magic of a little Raspberry Pi with a wood casing courtesy a Trotec 120Watt Laser Cutter?  One heckuva DIY laptop!

Between the Raspberry Pi, loaded with powerful capabilities in such a tiny little package and the Trotec (upcoming Trotec 120Watt Laser Cutter course April 20th!) making short work of model making, industrial design, prototyping and just about any kind of DIY application, this creative idea is a great example of an integration of both.

Trotec Laser Cutter and Raspberry Pi DIY laptopThis project also relies upon a 3D printed component (Ultimaker 3D Printer course, April 13th!in the design for the screen hinge, but the rest of the PlyTop is cut out of a three 2′ x 4′ sheets of 1/8″ Baltic birch plywood.

The Plytop base and top are held together with a fair amounts of translucent wood glue.

This design uses a Peripad II B Touchpad, apparently the only self contained touch pad close to the size of a normal laptop trackpad at a decent price. It sits neatly in the Plytop shell and works just fine out of the box with the Raspberry Pi 3. Plug ’em in and they behave like your typical trackpad.

The Waveshare 10.1 is the best LCD screen on the market that includes a form fitting HDMI interface driver, powered through USB. These screens come attached to a laser cut acrylic base and some cheap HDMI and USB cables.

The monitor is affixed with some very brittle plastic screws and nuts and will require an HDMI cable with a very low connector profile (Monoprice cable) to best fit into the Waveshare’s port once it’s installed in the top shell.

If you’d like to see this project coming together click HERE.

If you’d like to see all the plans and ingredients to make this neat little device click HERE!

 

 

Plytop DIY laptop - Raspberry Pi Trotec laser cutter

 

 

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Selkirk GLOWS West Kootenay & Boundary Science Fair

Selkirk College Regional Science Fair

Hosted by GLOWS and Selkirk College, the Regional Science Fair taking place Saturday, April 14, 2018 at Selkirk College’s Castlegar Campus Gymnasium is an opportunity for selected students to showcase their exemplary work.

The West Kootenay & Boundary Regional Science Fair gives top students from around the region an opportunity to showcase their select science experiments, studies, research or innovation projects to be judged by volunteers from various science professions.

Explore the world around you through inquiry-based learning! All Grade K to 12 students in School Districts 8, 10, 20, and 51 qualify. More than 100 youth are selected at the school level to enter in the annual West Kootenay & Boundary Regional Science Fair.

Why Participate in the West Kootenay & Boundary Regional Science Fair?

Science fair participation increases youth understanding and use of scientific inquiry and offers direct feedback on student projects, including research, experimentation and innovation. It also showcases local science education and career opportunities and allows youth to connect with science professionals working in a variety of fields.

Take an in-depth look at topics that are of interest by developing a science project in one of the following categories:

  • Innovation – Design and test new devices, models, theories, or method in any science discipline.
  • Research – Written study of a question of scientific interest.
  • Study – Analyze collections of data using accepted scientific methods.
  • Experiment – Actively test a hypothesis by experimental methods.

Find out all of the information HERE!

GLOWS-Regional Science Fair-2

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