MIDAS – Leading the Regional Maker Community

MIDAS Fab Lab is an integral leader in the Maker culture and community in the region: industry, startups, creatives, students – everyone welcome!

#madeatMIDAS MIDAS Fab Lab

If you’re looking for inspiration with regards to your existing business, the innovative idea you’ve been nurturing, or simply about the future of technology and innovation in the region and beyond, spend a couple of hours here in the MIDAS Fab Lab.

Step inside the doors and you’ll be welcomed by our exceptional team, either exuberant Fab Lab Director – “Mr. Technology” – and innovative entrepreneur in his own right, Brad Pommen or the more reserved but no less enthusiastic or inspiring MIDAS Lab Assistant, Shawn Curran, or both.

State-of-the-art Inspiration, Learning, Fabrication

MIDAS Fab Lab

The MIDAS (Metallurgical Industrial Development Acceleration Studies) Fabrication Lab is a multimillion-dollar technology hub offering our members the education, training, and skills required to operate advanced fabrication and manufacturing equipment such as 3D scanners and printers, laser cutters and CNC milling equipment.

The resources at MIDAS – skilled and knowledgeable team, courses, half a million dollars in state-of-the-art equipment – are available to aspiring and advanced learners and makers of all levels of expertise.

Every day creative innovators throughout the region explore the range of rapid prototyping and fabrication possibilities at MIDAS to advance their own aspirations and goals to expand their business and develop new products and services. Without MIDAS Fab Lab the limitations of developing new innovations and products could be so labour, time, and costs prohibitive as to stop an idea in its tracks.

Turning Ideas into Gold! Take Advantage of our Range of Exceptional Courses & Training to help Bring your Idea to Life!

MIDAS equipment is most often used for rapid prototyping and training in additive manufacturing, building 3D objects by adding layer upon layer of material, such as plastic, metal, wood, and even concrete. 

Our users are able to quickly create a 3D model of an item (using a remarkable 3D scanning device) to create, in some cases, industrial grade prototypes – mechanical parts, for instance – using 3D computer-aided design and a 3D printer.

It doesn’t end with 3D printing, however. Electronics, circuit construction, CNC machines, moulding, casting, metalwork and woodwork are also available.

Since the inception of our MIT-certified Fabrication Lab in the fall of 2016, over 1,000 people from all walks of life, from laymen to startups to industry, have been introduced to not only the potential of MIDAS but their own as well.

Curious and want to learn more? We host weekly tours Thursdays from 6-7pm. Join us!

#LearnCreateLaunch #madeatMIDAS #makersgonnamake

Fun Friday! Spider Lovers: Arduino Lego Arachnid

Arduino Lego Spider project

Have fun with this Lego arachnid controlled with your smartphone!

Whether you like spiders or not, this easy project is a ton of fun, bringing your Lego spider project – or any Lego project, really – to life.

This project is also rather timely as, now with the school year back in full swing and thoughts of RoboGames and Science Fair start to percolate, it provides a little maker inspiration in plenty of time.

Just beware, with this project you will have to glue your Lego bricks together as the spider, or probably anything you decide to make, will NOT move gently, and without glue will fall apart within only a few feet of walking!

Technical components you’ll need:

Arduino Nano R3

Dual H-Bridge motor drivers L298

2 x DC motor (generic)

4 x C.H.I.P Approved 3.7 V LiPo Battery (a 4S LiPo battery)

If you’d like the full design and operational schematics to this cool Arduino creature head on over HERE for complete details.

If you decide to take on this project, or any of our other Fun Friday! inspiration, please let us know and we’ll feature your creation!

Upcoming MIDAS Courses: October, 2018

MIDAS September 2018 courses

Still thinking about how you can get that great idea off the ground? MIDAS is here to help!

If you’re in need of prototyping, 3D printing and fabrication, the variety of equipment at MIDAS is geared specifically to offer you state-of-the-art resources to create exactly what you need.

Maybe you’ve already got a start using our fabrication equipment and are wanting to take it to the next level?  We’ve got you covered there, too!  Advanced certification courses are also available.

Check out our October calendar of courses and training… It’s all about 3D printing and we’re sure there’s a course to fit exactly what you’re looking for as you consider your next DIY/maker project.

This isn’t all, of course!  Be sure to review the full calendar of all upcoming workshops and courses here at MIDAS.

Trotec 120Watt Laser Cutter courses at MIDASTrotec 120 Watt Laser Cutter

The Speedy is the ideal laser engraving machine – no matter if you are starting your own business or want to speed up current production, laser engraving wood, plastic, acrylic, fabrics and many other materials, has never been more efficient. This CO2 laser engraver has the highest quality components which ensure minimal maintenance requirements.
Register NOW!

 

 

Shopbot CNC (Desktop & Alpha) Course at MIDAS

Shopbot CNC (Desktop & Alpha)

Training on BOTH the Desktop and Alpha Shopbot CNC included.  The ShopBot Desktop has a bed size of 24″ x 18″ and a 1HP motor.  This ShopBot Alpha is a full-size CNC with a 48″x96″ table with a 4HP motor.  Both machines are run by the same programming software and have full capability to mill 2d and 3d prototypes.
With enough production capability for a three-shift factory, ShopBot PRSalpha tools are tough and sophisticated, gantry-based CNC routers using advanced technology for CNC cutting, drilling, carving and machining.  Tooling and use make this pair of CNCs perfect for soft-material CNC cutting at any size.
Register NOW!

MIDAS courses & training: Creaform 700 3D Handyscan Scanner

Creaform 700 3D Handyscan Scanner

The Handyscan is AMAZING but don’t take our word for it. Come and see for yourself! This session will demonstrate the handyscan on a number of objects: how to place tags, basic scanning, set up of a receiving software and review of captured online files. (CAD and others on demand).

This course DOES NOT cover the manipulation of captured images or printing but is intended to allow members to scan and understand the potential of this device.

Recommended for engineers, architects, manufacturers, machinists, makers and hobbyists alike.
Register NOW!

ULTIMAKER 2 3D printerUltimaker 2 3D Printer

The Ultimaker 2 3D printer is easy and reliable, designed for the best experience in 3D printing.

Engineered to perform, this 3D digital printing workhorse is reliable, efficient, and user-friendly and particularly useful for artists, engineers, makers and innovators looking for fast, high quality prints in just about any size or material.

You can learn more and see a few recent projects HERE.

Register NOW!

 

Not what you’re looking for?  Take a look at our full calendar of upcoming workshops and courses.

Fun Friday! DIY Own Amazon Echo with Raspberry Pi

Build Your Own Amazon Echo with a Raspberry Pi

The Simplest Way to Build A Raspberry Pi-Powered Amazon Echo

The Amazon Echo can be a great device to have in your home. Upon voice command, it is capable of voice interaction, music playback, making to-do lists, setting alarms, streaming podcasts, playing audiobooks, and providing weather, traffic and other real-time information. It can also control several smart devices acting as a home automation hub; controlling the temperature of your home, for instance.

However, much like all of our other fun and convenient little gadgets, it comes at a price. Ranging from $50 to $150, it can be something of an expensive convenience, particularly if you’re not quite sold on its value.

If you’ve any Maker proclivities, though, and you’d like to see if there’s a DIY alternative, here’s your answer: through the wonders of the Raspberry Pi, here’s how you can create your own, fully-functional Amazon Echo.

A brand of smart speaker developed by the innovative folks at Amazon, the Amazon Echo (or simply Echo) connects to the voice-controlled intelligent personal assistant service Alexa.

Remarkably, this DIY Echo works just like the real device, activated simply by saying the wake word “Alexa”.

While other DIY versions make use of Amazon’s official resources, this project utilizes a GitHub project called Alexa Pi. This installs the identical Alexa voice service that Amazon uses onto your Raspberry Pi.

What you’ll need for your DIY Alexa:

A Raspberry Pi is at the top of the list and here are the rest of the components required:

  • A Raspberry Pi 3 (recommended), Raspberry Pi Zero W, or Raspberry Pi 2 (you’ll also need a USB Wi-FI adapter with the Model 2) with Raspbian installed and Wi-Fi set up. If you haven’t installed Raspbian before, our guide covers everything you need to know. While I’m going to concentrate on installing this on the Raspberry Pi, a number of other devices are supported. You can find a whole list here. I ran the installation on a C.H.I.P. as well just out of curiosity and it worked fine.
  • A MicroUSB power cable.
  • An 8GB MicroSD card.
  • A USB Microphone (I used this cheap $6 mic, but pretty much any USB mic seems to work. The $8 Playstation Eye seems to work especially well if you’re looking for a slight upgrade) If you’re using the Raspberry Pi Zero W you’ll also need a MicroUSB-USB adapter.
  • Speakers (any powered speaker does the job, I decided to use a UE Mini Boom because I already owned it and even when it’s plugged into the Pi, it still works as a Bluetooth speaker).
  • A Keyboard and Mouse for setup (or use SSH, Adafruit’s Pi Finder makes this project much easier to do from your main computer because you can copy/paste the longer commands).

Step One: Register for a Free Amazon Developer Account

Step One: Register for a Free Amazon Developer Account

First up, before you start assembling anything, you’ll need to register for a free Amazon Developer Account, and create a profile for your DIY Echo.

  1. Log into your Amazon Developer Account.
  2. Click on the Alexa Tab.
  3. Click Register a Product Type > Device.
  4. Name your device type and display name (I arbitrarily chose “Pi2” for both, though you can enter pretty much whatever you want here), then click Next.
  5. On the Security Profile screen, click “Create new profile.”
  6. Under the General tab, next to “Security Profile Name” name your profile. Do the same for the description. Click Next.
  7. Make a note of the Product ID, Client ID, and Client Secret that the site generates for you.
  8. Click the Web Settings tab, then click the Edit button next to the profile dropdown.
  9. Next to Allowed Origins, click, “Add Another” and type in: http://localhost:5050.
  10. Click “Add Another,” then type in http://your.raspberrypi.ip.address:5050 but replace with your.raspberrypi.ip.address with your Raspberry Pi’s IP address. You can find your Pi’s IP address using the Pi Finder tool detailed here.
  11. Next to Allowed Return URLs, click “Add Another” and type in: http://localhost:5050/code
  12. Click “Add Another” and add in http://your.raspberrypi.ip.address:5050/code once again replacing your.raspberrypi.ip.address with your own info. Click Next when you’re done.
  13. The Device Details tab is next. It doesn’t matter much what you enter here. Pick a category, write a description, pick an expected timeline, and enter a 0 on the form next to how many devices you plan on using this on. Click Next.
  14. Finally, you can choose to add in Amazon Music here. This does not work on the Pi powered device, so leave it checked as “No.” Click Save.

Now you have an Amazon Developer Account and you’ve created a profile for your Pi-powered Echo. It’s time to head over to the Raspberry Pi and get Alexa working.

Step Two: Install Git and AlexaPi

Step Two: Install Git and AlexaPi

Next you’ll need to fire up Terminal on your Raspberry Pi because everything happens in the command line. Before you start the installation you need to update and install a couple things:

  1. Type in sudo apt-get install update and press Enter to make sure your version of Raspbian is up to date. Let it do its thing here.
  2. Type insudo apt-get install git and press Enter to install Git. Again, let it do its thing.
  3. Type in cd /opt and press Enter to change the directory.
  4. Finally, type in sudo git clone https://github.com/alexa-pi/AlexaPi.git and press Enter to clone the AlexaPi GitHub repository. Again, give it a second to download and do its thing.

That’s it for the downloading portion, onward to actually installing it.

Step Three: Run the AlexaPi Installation Script

Step Three: Run the AlexaPi Installation Script

Next, you’ll run an installation script. This automates the installation of everything else you need to get your Echo up and running.

  1. Type in sudo ./AlexaPi/src/scripts/setup.sh and press Enter.
  2. You’ll be asked a series of questions. If you’re using the Raspberry Pi, just press Enter for both the operating system and device prompts. The last question asks if you want to add AirPlay support. If you have an iOS device, this makes it so you can easily stream music from your iPhone to your DIY Echo over Airplay. The script will then download a bunch of software for the next 5-10 minutes, so go ahead and relax for a bit.
  3. Eventually, you’ll be asked to enter in your Amazon developer information. Type in the Device Type ID and Security Profile Description you made way back in step one (we used AlexaPi). Next, you’ll need to enter in all those long, complicated numbers for your Profile ID, Client ID, Client Secret.
  4. Finally, the last thing you need to do is authorize your device. You only need to do this once. Head back to your main computer and open up a web browser. Than type in http://your.raspberrypi.ip.address:5050replacing your.raspberryi.ip.address with your Raspberry Pi’s IP address from earlier. You’ll then need to log into your Amazon account. After that, you’ll see an authorization token.

That’s it, the Alexa voice service is now installed on your Raspberry Pi. You just need to start the service. You can either just reboot your device completely, or type in sudo systemctl start AlexaPi.service and press Enter to start it.

Go ahead and try it, say “Alexa” into the mic, and it should reply back with a “Yes?”

If it’s not working, you can type in sudo systemctl status AlexaPi.service and press Enter to check the status.

Alexa will start up automatically when you reboot your device or if the power goes out for some reason, so you shouldn’t ever have to think about it again.

Thanks to LifeHacker for the resources for this project!

Here’s a fun little video fo the Alexa Pi or PiLexa in action:

Fun Friday! Fabtronic Sewing Kits

Fabtronic Sewing Set

Enter the world of e-textiles and wearables with Fabtronic Sewing Kits!

Custom reusable parts that allow you to make and remake as many times as you want! 

Electronic technology and wearables are becoming all the rage!

What began as watches and fitness trackers is evolving quickly to include e-fashion and e-textiles as well. Not only are they fun to wear, but they’re also a fun and creative activity while being a terrific way to get the basic foundation of electronics as well.

Smart Garments do what traditional fabrics cannot!

Electronic textiles, also known as smart garments, smart clothing, smart textiles, or smart fabrics, are fabrics that enable digital components such as a battery and a light (including small computers), and electronics to be embedded into them.

Smart textiles are fabrics that have been developed with new technologies that provide added value to the wearer. Pailes-Friedman of the Pratt Institute states that “what makes smart fabrics revolutionary is that they have the ability to do many things that traditional fabrics cannot, including communicate, transform, conduct energy and even grow”.

Smart textiles is typically broken into two categories: aesthetic and performance enhancing.

Aesthetic includes fabrics that light up and fabrics that can change colour. Some of these fabrics gather energy from the environment by harnessing vibrations, sound or heat, reacting to these inputs. The colour changing and lighting scheme can also work by embedding the fabric with electronics that can power it.

Performance enhancing smart textiles are intended for use in athletics, extreme sports and military applications. These include fabrics designed to regulate body temperature, reduce wind resistance, and control muscle vibration – all of which may improve athletic performance. 

If you’re just learning how to sew and want to learn a few basic electronics too, Fabtronic Sewing Kits are a really great way to get started.

 

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Building a Culture of Innovation

Insights from Greg Brouwer, General Manager, Technology and Innovation

Building a Culture of Innovation Insights from Greg Brouwer, General Manager, Technology and Innovation

In January of this year, Greg Brouwer was appointed General Manager, Technology and Innovation, responsible for advancing Teck’s innovation and technology activities and strategy.

In addition to managing that pipeline of activities, Greg and his team are also doing an internal and external scan of ways we can evolve and strengthen our culture of innovation.

Here, Greg shares some observations on what that scan has unearthed and the opportunities that have been revealed.

On Harnessing Energy and Excitement…

“There’s a lot of buzz and excitement in the innovation and technology space, so near-term, one of our focus areas is how to harness that energy and excitement and derive value in the most efficient and effective way.”

“An important part of that is looking at how we can embed a culture of innovation at Teck, which means each of us feeling a responsibility to innovate and also having the mechanisms in place to share ideas.”

“This can be a challenge; how do you unleash the energy in a workforce of 10,000+ and manage that properly so that we’re evaluating ideas efficiently, always with a view of driving real and material value.”

“To help improve that process, we’re doing some benchmarking work to see how other companies have done this really well, and we’re also looking internally, getting feedback from a cross section of business and functional units, to get their views on ways we can effectively harness this energy and drive Teck’s culture of innovation forward.”

On Being Ready for Change…

“A lot of our workforce is very comfortable using powerful technology in their day-to-day lives—it’s actually quite amazing; the mobile phones we carry in our pockets today are millions of times more powerful than the computing technologies NASA used to first land humans on the moon in 1969.”

“At the same time, the cost of those powerful technologies has decreased dramatically.”

“Together, this makes it much easier, and an opportune time, to bring new technologies to Teck and leverage the benefits; we’re excited to see where that will take us over the coming years.”

On Opportunities and the Digital Technology Supercluster…

“Teck’s involvement in Canada’s Digital Technology Supercluster has great potential to involve our employees in exciting innovation projects in a completely new way, and also to pilot groundbreaking technology at
Teck sites.”

“As a founding member of the Digital Technology Supercluster, Teck is operating in an ecosystem that’s very different than groups we normally interact with; from start-ups to medium-size tech companies, we’ll have tremendous opportunities to work closely with other companies, non-profits and academia on really big, ambitious goals that have the potential to fundamentally change mining and other industries, in really positive ways.”

Canada’s Innovation Superclusters Initiative

Canada’s Innovation Superclusters Initiative

Announced in February of this year, Teck is a founding member of the Digital Technology Supercluster, one of five Superclusters formed by the Government of Canada as part of their Innovation Superclusters Initiative.

Through the initiative, the Government of Canada is investing up to $950 million—to be matched by the private sector—to support business-led innovation superclusters through high-value, strategic investments with the greatest potential to accelerate economic growth. It’s projected that over the next 10 years, the initiative will generate 50,000 jobs and grow Canada’s gross domestic product (GDP) by $50 billion.

The Digital Technology Supercluster is based in B.C. and will advance projects that are guided by defined industry needs. The chosen projects will advance solutions using virtual, mixed and augmented reality, data analytics and quantum computing, to help solve some of the most pressing productivity, health and sustainability challenges facing Canada and the world today.

Originally posted at Teck’s Connect.

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3D Design & Printing with TinkerCad | September 7, 2018

3D Design & Printing with TinkerCad

From mind to design in minutes

Tinkercad is a free online collection of software tools that help people all over the world think, create and make. It’s the ideal introduction to Autodesk, the leader in 3D design, engineering and entertainment software.

You don’t need to know CAD to make and print awesome 3D models

Tinkercad is the largest community of 3D design and 3D printing enthusiasts of its kind!

Free, easy-to-use app for 3D design, electronics, and coding. It’s used by teachers, kids, hobbyists, and designers to imagine, design, and make anything!

Tinkercad is an easy, browser-based 3D design and modelling tool allowing users to imagine anything and then design it in minutes.

This course will give starting tools and tips in 3D Design with TinkerCad from Autodesk, a powerful but intuitive to learn design program.

You’ll also learn how to 3D Print these designs in this dual class! You’ll be printing your design on the Ultimaker 2 3D printer. It’s easy and reliable, designed for the best experience in 3D printing.   Engineered to perform, this 3D digital printing workhorse is efficient and super user-friendly; particularly useful for artists, engineers, makers and innovators looking for fast, high-quality prints in just about any size or material.

REGISTER NOW!

Fun Friday: Back-to-school Maker Edition!

Dedicated maker spaces in local schools

The brand new B.C. curriculum has Glenmerry students learning 21st century skills in applied technologies, such as coding and robotics, in their designated makerspace. Elsewhere in the Kootenay Columbia district, Fruitvale Elementary School also has a makerspace classroom that includes its own 3D printer.

As summer winds down we’re all starting to think about the getting ready for back-to-school and wondering where the heck summer went!

Yup, it went fast! But… let’s not get too bummed out.

There’s actually reason to be excited about going back. Thankfully, school isn’t simply about the three Rs anymore. Around the country, province, and regionally, we’re seeing the Maker Movement take hold, not just in our communities with the advent of more and more makerspaces, but in our schools.

Earlier this year, the new BC curriculum expanded to include not only learning in coding and robotics, but also designated maker spaces in the classroom.

These spaces encourage creative, education freedom. Makerspaces are now being recognized for their teaching potential, being integrated into K-12 schools and libraries. Makerspaces foster and drive the desire for young technology and hands-on DIY enthusiasts to take innovation into their own hands. When students are given the opportunity to work, hands-on, with a variety of materials, they learn by doing instead of merely listening or reading.

This approach provides a practical and far more memorable way of learning a new skill or subject matter. This experience not only allows the child to learn something new through their own problem-solving, but it’s also often far more rewarding.

Inspired by hacker culture, makerspaces provide creative learning and innovation opportunities made possible with a supply of equipment, materials and resources for making a range of projects, tech-oriented and otherwise, in any work space, classroom, or community centre.

In these settings, making can range from a digital media lab, supporting multimedia creation and 3-D printing to multidisciplinary inventing, combining mechanics and electronics with social studies and music. Taking it down a notch, it can also be a space to introduce simple engineering concepts through building projects with items such as popsicle sticks and legos. A makerspace doesn’t have to be complicated for the learning opportunities vast and varied.

Glenmerry and Fruitvale elementary schools designate makerspaces in the classroom

Early 2018 saw two local elementary schools embrace the Maker Movement, promoting a foundation in Applied Design, Skills and Technology, or ADST.

ADST basics can be introduced in Kindergarten and evolve with the child and their interests up through the elementary grades and amped up through high school.

Referring to the spaces as Open Source Lab, Glenmerry and Fruitvale elementary schools, in School District 20,  begin instruction as early as Grade 1.

“It is a class, like math, science and social studies,” explains Mike Page, a Grade 5 Glenmerry teacher. “The best part about this is cross-curricular, (meaning) we can teach math, science, art, music, anything, through our makerspace.”

These spaces will include introductions to coding, robotics, virtual and augmented reality, 3D design and 3D printing.

As an example of the range of maker eduction, the Grade 1 class joined Page’s students in a project that incorporated learning both outdoors as well as in.

“We went outside and looked at snowflakes,” he explained. “Then we read a book about how everyone is an individual just like every snowflake is individual or different, and then the grade one students drew a snowflake that resembled them.”

The Grade 5 class took each unique snowflake drawing, designed it three-dimensionally and then printed the 3D image for the younger students.

“That led to learning about science, surface texture, surface tension and so on,” said Page.

This education approach is identified as interdisciplinary or cross-curricular teaching, applying knowledge, principles and/or values to more than one academic discipline simultaneously.

“It’s their favourite part of the day,” said Page. “The students don’t know they are learning, and you’ll see these ‘aha’ moments … it’s about facing a challenge, not being able to do it, and saying ‘I can’ rather than ‘I can’t.’”

As a result, students learn “growth mindset,” or the belief that basic abilities can be developed through dedication and hard work, ideally fostering a love of learning as well as resilience.

“It’s hard, kids fail everyday but then they learn and they grow and they get better, ” Page said. “And this is through something fun, you watch the kids struggle and fail, then improve.”

This is a fundamental to the makerspace experience: trial and error, hands-on learning, and success through a variety of failures!

MIDAS was happy to play a role this new local evolution in youth education.

“We would not be here without MIDAS,” said Page. “They are great at teaching teachers, and getting us engaged.”

An integral part of makerspace learning involves “STREAM,” a concept Page says they swiped from MIDAS Lab Director Brad Pommen.

It refers to Science, Technology, Robotics, Engineering, Artisan and Makers, Pommen explained.

“Students are disconnected from the origins of objects they use everyday, from iPhones to 3D printers, resources are difficult to navigate and find guidance,” he said.

“Having a base in my STREAM curriculum ultimately opens up their world and provides them confidence to build, learn and share their ideas.”

Concepts overlap and create linkages that facilitate education across all classroom subjects.

“Learning how to build, program and compete a robot (in RoboGames) combines programming technologies,” Pommen added. “Robotics introduces logic, engineering speaks to the design aspects, and maker is putting the whole physical package together, with 3D printing for example.”

This evolution in education, particularly at the primary level, is a great reason to get excited about the new school year. Hands-on, exploration, investigation, building, fabrication, coding rather than simply consuming – and yes, even the failures – are where the deep lessons and inspiration live.

What a great time to go back-to-school!

Upcoming MIDAS Courses: September, 2018

MIDAS September 2018 courses

Summer is on the wane and, as summer vacation activities wrap up and the kids head off to school, it’s all about learning  new things! Not just for the kids, for you, too! Fall is the perfect season to get inspired and get moving on that great idea you’ve been contemplating all summer! And MIDAS is here to help!

If you’re in need of prototyping, 3D printing and fabrication, the variety of equipment at MIDAS is geared specifically to offer you state-of-the-art resources to create exactly what you need.

Maybe you’ve already got a start using our fabrication equipment and are wanting to take it to the next level?  We’ve got you covered there, too!  Advanced certification courses are also available.

Check out our September calendar of courses and training… we’re sure there’s a course to fit exactly what you’re looking for as you consider your next diy/maker project.

This isn’t all, of course!  Be sure to review the full calendar of all upcoming workshops and courses here at MIDAS.
MIDAS courses & training: Creaform 700 3D Handyscan Scanner

Creaform 700 3D Handyscan Scanner

The Handyscan is AMAZING but don’t take our word for it. Come and see for yourself! This session will demonstrate the handyscan on a number of objects: how to place tags, basic scanning, set up of a receiving software and review of captured online files. (CAD and others on demand). This course DOES NOT cover the manipulation of captured images or printing but is intended to allow members to scan and understand the potential of this device. Recommended for engineers, architects, manufacturers, machinists, makers ad hobbyists alike.
Register NOW!

 

3D Printing Made With TinkerCad_2

3D Design & Printing with TinkerCad

This course will give starting tools and tips in 3D Design with TinkerCad from Autodesk, a powerful but intuitive to learn design program. Also, how to 3D Print these designs is instructed in this dual class!
Register NOW!

Trotec 120Watt Laser Cutter courses at MIDASTrotec 120 Watt Laser Cutter

The Speedy is the ideal laser engraving machine – no matter if you are starting your own business or want to speed up current production, laser engraving wood, plastic, acrylic, fabrics and many other materials has never been more efficient. This CO2 laser engraver has the highest quality components which ensures minimal maintenance requirements.
Register NOW!

 

 

Shopbot CNC (Desktop & Alpha) Course at MIDAS

Shopbot CNC (Desktop & Alpha)

Training on BOTH the Desktop and Alpha Shopbot CNC included.  The ShopBot Desktop has a bed size of 24″ x 18″ and a 1HP motor.  This ShopBot Alpha is a full-size CNC with a 48″x96″ table with a 4HP motor.  Both machines are run by the same programming software and have full capability to mill 2d and 3d prototypes.
With enough production capability for a three-shift factory, ShopBot PRSalpha tools are tough and sophisticated, gantry-based CNC routers using advanced technology for CNC cutting, drilling, carving and machining.  Tooling and use make this pair of CNCs perfect for soft-material CNC cutting at any size.
Register NOW!

Tormach Metal CNC Mill coursesTormach Metal CNC Mill

The ultimate in 3-axis metal CNC technology. Designed for aluminum, light metals and composite plastics – this machine packs horsepower. This machine is not for beginners – only experienced CNC operators can be certified, but anyone can take the course.
Register NOW!

Roland MonoFab SRM-20 Mini Milling Machine training at MIDASRoland MonoFab SRM-20 Mini Milling Machine

The SRM-20 offers compact size and powerful functionality for production ready, realistic parts and prototypes. A wide range of materials, including modeling wax, chemical wood, foam, acrylic, poly acetate, ABS and PCB’s can be precision milled with this machine at MIDAS.
Register NOW!

 

ULTIMAKER 2 3D printerUltimaker 2 3D Printer

The Ultimaker 2 3D printer is easy and reliable, designed for the best experience in 3D printing.   Engineered to perform, this 3D digital printing workhorse is reliable, efficient, and user-friendly and particularly useful for artists, engineers, makers and innovators looking for fast, high quality prints in just about any size or material.

You can learn more and see a few recent projects HERE.

Register NOW!

The MarkForged Mark Two course at MIDASMarkForged 3D Printer

April 9th:  This is a certification course.

The Mark Two is an industrial strength 3D printer here at the MIDAS Lab and using continuous fiber inlays together with high-performance nylons, it creates parts that can compete with metal!

You can learn more about the Markforged HERE.

Register NOW!

 

Not what you’re looking for?  Take a look at our full calendar of upcoming workshops and courses.

Fun Friday! 6 Cool & Pretty Easy Welding Maker Projects!

Welding is one of those maker activities that most might consider requires skills well beyond their capacity and might stick to arduino, 3D printing and basic carpentry projects seemingly more accessible.

But, welding doesn’t have to be hard and can actually be a lot of fun. With these few projects you can increase your confidence and skills whereby you may even feel up to taking on those home repairs you’ve been putting off or perhaps even getting creative with metalwork art.

Here are some great project ideas to introduce you to the range of skills and equipment required, while making some pretty cool stuff!

DIY welded jewelry treeJewelry Holder. This is a wonderfully simple project that requires you to weld small, straight steel pieces together into the shape of a tree.

You then weld the tree to a square piece of steel so that it can be set on a table or dresser.

You can choose to decorate the project to make it look realistic or allow the rustic steel look to stand.

Learn how HERE.

 

 

metal table welding projectsDIY Metal Table. This simple table uses a handful of straight metal pieces that are welded together into a frame.

Metal slats on top provide spaces for clamping, providing a sturdy space for heavy projects that is still light enough to move.

Click HERE for instructions.

 

 

welded stackable side tableTV Tray Tables. This is a beautiful addition to any home or office.

Also great as a side table, a laptop stand, and much more. The C-table design requires minimal welding and is very forgiving to beginners.

Dozens of ideas that follow this frame give you the options you need.

 

 

DIY welded doorbellDIY Doorbell. A unique and beautiful addition to your exterior decor.

All it took to complete this project was a small argon cylinder and some scrap steel.

You can mount it directly onto your home exterior or attach it to your preferred material to add a unique look to your property.

A total conversation piece for you and your visitors!

Learn how HERE.

 

 

DIY welded fire pitDIY Firepit. This unique fire pit was made simply with a half-sheet of steel.

A textured steel was used for this project, but any steel plate of 2.1 mm thickness will get the job done. You can also adjust the size of the design to meet your specific needs.

Make it “fire ban” friendly by adding propane fittings.

Instructions are HERE.

 

 

DIY welded benchGarden or Mudroom Bench. This project requires 1-inch square tubing.

Other than that, you can build it to your own preferred dimensions. It does require some metal cutting as a skill, but otherwise, this little bench will add a nice touch to any home.

Learn more HERE.