Fun Friday! DIY Foam Paddle Board

We are near mid-summer and the weather has been nothing short of glorious! And, with all of this sublime weather, no doubt everyone has been enjoying their local waterhole, river, or lake with their favourite watercraft.

Fun Friday! DIY standup paddle board

Looking for a Standup Paddle Board Without the Steep Price Tag?

If you’ve been coveting the rash of standup paddle board (SUP) activity but purchasing one isn’t in your summer budget, the innovative folks over at instructables are offering the perfect DIY alternative.

While the cost of a SUP has certainly come down over the past few years, it’s still a rather grand sum to pay for some hollow plastic.  But, with a little initiative, a few tools, and some good ol’ fashioned elbow grease here’s a way for you to relax on the water with unique hand-crafted style and a totally do-able price tag – guaranteed to be one-of-a-kind!

Here’s What You Need (costs are approximate):

A sheet rigid foam insulation 2″ thick ($25).  This may even be something you or a DIY neighbour already has on hand, so the price may be even lower!

Insulation saw ($12).

Two large tubes of construction adhesive ($6).

A fine notch plastic trowel ($1.50).

A wood rasp ($6.50).

Orbital sander.

An optional 1/4″ sheet of plywood ($20).

Heavy items – sandbags, cinder blocks, bricks, etc. – to help set the glue.

The total cost (cash money, that is) is only about $50, possibly less if you’re able to source from your own garage, or those of your friends and family. The real cost for this project is your time and energy.

DIY Standup Paddle Board

Building Instructions:

1. Lay out the paddle board shape on heavy paper or stretches of cardboard. If you’ve got a model to use that’s ideal, but most online retailers’ product descriptions provide the dimensions you need. Prepare for this to take some time – it’s worth it!

There will be additional time tracing and retracing if you’re incorporating the plywood deck surface.  In this example, the SUP is kid-sized: 4″ thick and 24″ wide. If you want to make a 12 footer you’ll need more foam.  Note: the wood deck does make for a more slick surface, the bare foam actually provides some grip.

2. Glue the foam together.

3. The board ought not be left flat. There should be a rocker of a few degrees on both ends.
Trace out the curve of the nose rocker onto the profile and sculpt with a long razor.
Once the shape is roughed out use the wood rasp to remove the rest and to make the curves more hydrodynamic. FYI:  working with the foam is messy!  It’s recommended that you set up some means of dust collection (ie. ShopVac on hand!).

Finish the smoothing with an orbital sander, stepping down the grits.

4. To make the plywood impermeable to water, it needs to be prepared with polyurethane on both sides. After sanding the edges and top of the deck board, apply four coats of poly, sanding the top side between coats. Don’t worry about the underside as it will be glued to the foam. Once it’s dry, and before securing with glue to the SUP, test the placement of the deck. Lightly trace the outline of the deck so that you know where to spread the adhesive. Coat both the foam and the underside of the deck with your adhesive. Place the deck with care and press the two parts together and leave overnight under pressure.

There you have it! Don’t forget, you can apply laser cut vinyl, or paint designs, to customize your unique DIY board. If you’d like more photos and far more detail into the construction of the handmade SUP, check it out HERE!

BTW, if you’re new to DIY for projects like this, check out the MIDAS course calendar for all kinds of education and training into the kinds of equipment and design software that make creating these kinds of projects just that much easier.

#LearnCreateLaunch #madeatMIDAS #makersgonnamake

Maker Movement Inspiring Young Innovators With EdTech Toys

Maker movement inspiring young innovators with EdTech Toys

Constructible rides by Infento offer a new twist on toys.

In this era of intense technology consumption, particularly among young people, there’s all manner of conversation going on – at home, in schools, at the workplace – about how to manage it in the name of establishing healthy balance.

Forward-thinking companies are seeing ways to address the issues surrounding young people and technology and seeing another avenue that doesn’t so much limit technology as leverage it, in the form of EdTech toys, that serve to bring the maker spirit and innovation to how young people engage with tech.  End game: inspiring a new generation of makers and innovators, where toys teach the skill sets needed to create rather than simply consume modern technology.

EdTech Toys Engage Children, Inspire Maker Spirit: Innovation, Imagination, Creativity

Makers are teachers, entrepreneurs, professionals, students, DIY hobbyists or simply tinkerers in their own garage.  What unites all of these individuals is the maker spirit – a fascination with creating, often utilizing various means of technology.

The Maker Movement maintains that we are all makers.  Particularly given that today, almost half of all Canadians identify as being part of the maker community, regardless age or gender.

When you consider the focus that STEM/STEAM education has recently taken this number should come as no surprise.  Schools are looking to the maker community, which successfully incorporates inquiry-based and active learning (learning-by-doing) as part of the maker philosophy, to inform their classrooms and teaching techniques, particularly when it comes to attracting students who have become disengaged by formal educational settings.

More and more schools and community centres are beginning to convert spaces into active maker spaces to encourage exploration and experimentation with technology. Makerspaces and Maker Faires are cropping up in communities from coast-to-coast and across the globe, promoting a DIY mentality and innovative, maker spirit.

At the heart of the maker movement is an ideology that innovation should be collaborative, fun and based on exploration. In this vein, new opportunities are being explored by forward-thinking companies, launching EdTech oriented activities and toys geared specifically to teach these skill sets to inspire a new generation of innovators.

For example, one company called Infento has developed the world’s first kit for families that lets them build real constructible rides together using simple modular parts. The building process is designed like a game, with the first task being the construction of a simple toolbox made out of cardboard that teaches children all of the different pieces. From there, a family would decide which ride they want to create and use online instructions to start building.

The name Infento is a combination of two Latin words: “infinitus” (infinite) and “planto” (to make). When pronounced, the name sounds like “invent,” which is exactly what Infento hopes families will be inspired to do with this collaborative experience.

Infento’s newest Kickstarter campaign enables families to use only one kit and one hex key to create a huge range of rides, from walkers and scooters for toddlers all the way up to go-karts, skibocks and sledges for teens.

Similarly, Nintendo released a modular kit called the Nintendo Labo that enables young people to create interactive gaming elements for the Switch out of cardboard. Options include a miniature piano, a fishing pole, a robot and even a motorbike. However, the best part of these accessories is that they help children to understand how these elements function.

Makey MakeyA third toy that is finding itself more and more often listed alongside Raspberry Pi and Arduino is the Makey Makey.  This handy gadget can turn everyday objects into computer input touchpads, so, for instance, a banana becomes the space bar.the

It’s a simple invention kit for beginners and experts doing art, engineering, and everything in between.  This is a kit that teaches young people how to use alligator clips to add connectivity and conductivity to everyday objects like bananas and donuts to create music, touchpads, interactive maps and more.

Makey Makey inspires children to come up with their own designs, all while teaching them basic principles of electrical engineering and coding.

The advancement of toys such as these are indicative of an important shift in thinking for the younger generations. Rather than being passive consumers of technology, young people turn into active creators, developing creativity and skills in true maker fashion.

Organizations like the XPRIZE Foundation recognize the value of this out-of-the-box thinking and have even begun incentivizing young people to put their innovation skills to the test. Most recently, the Shell Ocean Discovery XPRIZE announced a challenge for students between the ages of 12 and 18 to “Design a Deep-Sea Treasure” that could be placed on the ocean floor to help map the final frontier on the earth. Winners can earn up to $2,000 cash and another $5,000 for their supporting school or organization.

Innovative Maker Companies Returning Childhood to Its Hands-on Roots

While there are still many valid reasons to be concerned, as parents, about our kids’ experience with technology, it’s reassuring to see companies leveraging it to encourage active rather than passive engagement.

Looking to employ the maker spirit in their toys and games, innovative companies are incorporating technology while actually drawing on old school roots encouraging exploration, discovery, creativity, and collaborative play.

Reigniting a joy of learning, building skills, inspiring ideas and collaboration; empowering kids to dive in and get their hands dirty, have fun, developing the skills they need to make technology work for them, not the other way around.

#madeatMIDAS #makersgonnamake

 

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Fun Friday! Learn Something Cool: 3D Design & Printing with TinkerCad

3D Printing Made With TinkerCad_2

If you’re looking for a terrific opportunity to learn the basics of 3D Design, this course is for you!

Using TinkerCad from Autodesk, a powerful and intuitive design program, this course will give you the tools you need to get you started in 3D Design.  Through the power of TinkerCad you can quickly turn your idea into a CAD model for a 3D printer.  

You don’t need to know CAD to make and 3D print awesome 3D models

Tinkercad is a simple, online 3D design and 3D printing app for everyone.  An easy, browser-based 3D design and modeling tool, Tinkercad allows users to imagine anything and then design it in minutes.  It’s used by designers, hobbyists, teachers, and kids, to make prototypes, home decor, toys, Minecraft models, jewelry – the list is really quite endless!

This course will give starting tools and tips in 3D Design with TinkerCad from Autodesk, a powerful but intuitive to learn design program. Also, how to 3D Print these designs is instructed in this dual class!

TinkerCad SO easy to use!

3D Design & Printing with TinkerCad - MIDAS training

Shapes are the basic building blocks of Tinkercad. Any shape can add or remove material, and you can also import or create your own shapes.

By grouping together a set of shapes you can create new models to work with. Build intricate shapes and create extremely detailed models.

Create vector shapes, then import and extrude them into 3D models.

The possibilities are endless once you learn these fundamentals to 3D Design Printing.  Register NOW to get the fabrication skills you need to bring your idea to life!

Course date:  July 23, 3018.

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Upcoming MIDAS Courses: Summer, 2018

Summer may mean break for many, but not the team at MIDAS!  In fact, we see summer as the perfect time to learn something new, develop new skills and start getting some momentum behind the great idea you’ve been nursing through the dreary spring months.

It’s inspiration time!  Summer at MIDAS is a lineup of great training opportunities here in our state-of-the-art Fab Lab, enjoying the best in expert instruction.  Don’t let that great idea simmer any longer, it’s time to take action and MIDAS is here to help!

If you’re in need of prototyping, 3D printing and fabrication, the variety of equipment at MIDAS is geared specifically to offer you state-of-the-art resources to create exactly what you need.

Maybe you’ve already got a start using our fabrication equipment and are wanting to take it to the next level?  We’ve got you covered there, too!  Advanced certification courses are also available.

Peruse the courses and training outlined below… we’re sure there’s a course to fit exactly what you’re looking for as you consider your next diy/maker project.

This isn’t all, of course!  Be sure to review the full calendar of all upcoming workshops and courses here at MIDAS.

Tormach Metal CNC Mill courses

Tormach Metal CNC Mill

July 5th:  The ultimate in 3-axis metal CNC technology. Designed for aluminum, light metals and composite plastics – this machine packs horsepower. This machine is not for beginners – only experienced CNC operators can be certified, but anyone can take the course.

Register NOW!

 

 

Trotec 120Watt Laser Cutter courses at MIDAS

Trotec 120 Watt Laser Cutter

July 9th & August 13th:  The Speedy is the ideal laser engraving machine – no matter if you are starting your own business or want to speed up current production, laser engraving wood, plastic, acrylic, fabrics and many other materials has never been more efficient. This CO2 laser engraver has the highest quality components which ensures minimal maintenance requirements.

Register NOW!

 

 

Shopbot CNC (Desktop & Alpha) Course at MIDASShopbot CNC (Desktop & Alpha)

July 13th & August 10th:  Training on BOTH the Desktop and Alpha Shopbot CNC included.  The ShopBot Desktop has a bed size of 24″ x 18″ and a 1HP motor.  This ShopBot Alpha is a full-size CNC with a 48″x96″ table with a 4HP motor.  Both machines are run by the same programming software and have full capability to mill 2d and 3d prototypes.
With enough production capability for a three-shift factory, ShopBot PRSalpha tools are tough and sophisticated, gantry-based CNC routers using advanced technology for CNC cutting, drilling, carving and machining.  Tooling and use make this pair of CNCs perfect for soft-material CNC cutting at any size.

MIDAS course: Roland MonoFab

Roland MonoFab SRM-20 Mini Milling Machine

July 27th:  The SRM-20 offers compact size and powerful functionality for production ready, realistic parts and prototypes. A wide range of materials, including modeling wax, chemical wood, foam, acrylic, poly acetate, ABS and PCB’s can be precision milled with this machine at MIDAS.

Register NOW!

 

 

Creaform 700 3D Handyscan Scanner courses at MIDAS

Creaform 700 3D Handyscan Scanner

July 30th:  The Handyscan is AMAZING but don’t take our word for it. Come and see for yourself! This session will demonstrate the handyscan on a number of objects: how to place tags, basic scanning, set up of a receiving software and review of captured online files. (CAD and others on demand). This course DOES NOT cover the manipulation of captured images or printing but is intended to allow members to scan and understand the potential of this device. Recommended for engineers, architects, manufacturers, machinists, makers ad hobbyists alike.

Register NOW!

ULTIMAKER 2 3D printer

Ultimaker 2 3D Printer

August 17th:  The Ultimaker 2 3D printer is easy and reliable, designed for the best experience in 3D printing.   Engineered to perform, this 3D digital printing workhorse is reliable, efficient, and user-friendly and particularly useful for artists, engineers, makers and innovators looking for fast, high quality prints in just about any size or material.

You can learn more and see a few recent projects HERE.

Register NOW!

 

The MarkForged Mark Two course at MIDAS

MarkForged 3D Printer

August 20th:  This is a certification course.

The Mark Two is an industrial strength 3D printer here at the MIDAS Lab and using continuous fiber inlays together with high-performance nylons, it creates parts that can compete with metal!

You can learn more about the Markforged HERE.

Register NOW!

 

Not what you’re looking for?  Take a look at our full calendar of upcoming workshops and courses.

Membership at MIDAS: What It Can Do For You!

#madeatMIDAS Corporate membership

We at MIDAS are so proud of our Corporate Services.  Membership to the MIDAS Fabrication Lab opens up so many opportunities to expand, develop and grow your business and, ultimately, help you fulfill your innovation or entrepreneurial dreams.

Membership:  beat the competition through rapid prototyping at MIDAS

MIDAS specializes in fast-iteration, short-run and rapid prototyping.  Our membership services are open to regional companies, including start-ups, with a focus on supporting prototype and product commercialization.

Our facility is unique to the entire region, providing members with the best in state-of-the-art modern technology tools – almost half a million dollars in superior digital fabrication equipment and industry leading expertise to help bring your idea or innovation to life!

3D printing technology, CNC milling, vinyl cutting and more!  In addition to the equipment, MIDAS offers the necessary training, providing makers, companies, entrepreneurs and employees with advanced skills to turn business dreams to reality while defining our region as experts in advanced materials/metals and digital fabrication.  With a membership at MIDAS you can get the customized training you need to help you and your business get ahead, embracing new technology and maximizing your business’ potential through the variety of tools and equipment available.  Prototype development can be had at any stage, allowing you to get your product to market faster, hands-on, locally right here in your own backyard.

From engineers to aspiring, innovative entrepreneurs MIDAS customizes the experience to ensure you’re getting exactly what you need to develop your product or service.  Have an idea?  Join the MIDAS corporate membership to help get it out the door!

#madeatMIDAS #makersgonnamake #metaltechalley

 

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Fun Friday: DIY 3D Printed Fidget Spinner

DIY 3D printed fidget spinner

Despite being on trend for the past several years, Fidget Spinners are everywhere!  This little gadget of mindless distraction is likely the single most 3D printed item, and very simple in design, so it’s understandable why makers, young and old, are eager to design their own version.

This is a great 3D printing project because it will provide you all there is to know about the mechanics of fidget spinners and how to create your 3D printable file.

DIY 3D printed Fidget Spinner

The Fidget Spinner is a simple project that uses three 3D-printed parts and a bearing from McMaster-Carr. Learn how to use the McMaster-Carr part browser, basic 3D modeling, and how to make mechanical joints.

Modelling demo and files:  If you’re unfamiliar with Fusion 360, here’s a handy 3D Printing Class to get crash course in using the program.  The application is free to students and hobbyists, so there’s plenty to be had for educational support as you get to know it.

This is a fun and pretty easy project, and if you follow the complete instructions, which includes instructional webinars and video, totally do-able for the beginner maker.

3D design and printing truly allows just about anyone access to fabrication and prototyping with relative ease.  If you’re interested in learning the basics in design, 3D printing and fabrication, be sure to check out all of the cool courses we have on offer.

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Fun Friday! Easy & Fun Beginner Maker Ed Projects

banana apple makeymakey DIY beginner maker projects

Maker Ed, or Maker Education, is a new school of educational thought that focuses on delivering constructivist, project-based learning curriculum and instruction to students. As the Maker Movement begins to make inroads into conventional education, maker education spaces are geared to facilitating hands-on learning experiences that incorporate both low and high tech, and can be as large as full high school workshops with high-tech tools, or as small and low-tech as one corner of an elementary classroom.

Maker Ed is particularly effective when leveraging the balance between exploration and execution. Small projects lend themselves to indefinite tinkering and fiddling, while larger projects need complex, coordinated planning. Often, small projects can organically grow into larger and larger projects. This deliberate process strengthens and enriches a learner’s executive functioning skills.

Effective Maker Ed isn’t just about the tools and technology.  Communication and collaboration are two of Maker Ed’s fundamental values. Making allows learners to practice their social communication skills in a variety of ways:  Affinity-based, where students organize themselves in real world and/or Internet (or virtual) to learn something connected to a shared endeavor, interest, or passion; role-specific, where the learning is customized dependent upon the specific tasks and function of the project and the training is presented in the context of a specific role ands what it takes to perform that role; or, teacher-assigned, where the educator facilitates more directly assigning each student to a particular task in the project.  It’s important for all different groups to be present in student learning spaces so that all students can practice their social skills in multiple settings.

Additionally, making offers unique opportunities to generate flow learning, an optimal psychological state that students experience when engaged in an activity that is appropriately challenging to their individual skill levels while encouraging immersion and concentrated focus on a task. Flow learning allows for deeper learning experiences as well as higher levels of personal and work satisfaction where the teacher is better able to leverage high-interest projects and activities and turn them into learning objectives within a curriculum.

Ultimately, we are talking about collaboration and learning through doing.  Maker education provides the space for real-life collaboration, integration across multiple disciplines, and iteration—the opportunity to fail, rework a project and find success.

We at MIDAS are fully committed to supporting the efforts of educators and makers looking to promote a cooperative learning environment where collaboration and education work hand-in-hand encouraging innovation in the most fun and organic ways possible.

New to the Maker Culture and education?  Here are a few fun and easy suggestions to get things going with the young – or old – aspiring makers in your life:

Smaller Scale Maker Ed Projects

Do you want to get into Making and Maker Ed but don’t know where to start? No problem! Here are nine class-tested, teacher-approved ideas, which can be built using a few tools for K–8 students.

tower of power beginner maker projectTowers of Power

Materials:  Paper, Scotch tape.

Tools: Scissors.

A great starting point for a beginning Maker teacher, this “Towers of Power” activity allows students to build towers out of paper and Scotch tape.

Students can build the tallest tower with an unlimited amount of materials, constrain themselves to limited materials or introduce new materials, such as straws and paper clips.

Once it’s complete, have fun crushing the tower with textbooks! Find out which tower holds up the most weight.

This group activity can help students with teamwork, leadership and planning skills. Best of all, variations on this theme are endless — and the materials can be found in any home or office.

simple catapult beginner maker projectCatapults

Materials:  Mouse traps, wood stirring sticks, erasers, wood blocks, ping-pong balls. hot glue.

Tools: a hot glue gun.

 

Introducing elements of STEM, this catapult activity is a favourite project to introduce engineering principles, motion and fun. The catapult allows students to chase down the best launching angle and the ratio between power and arm length, as well as discuss projectile motion, gravity, physics laws and a whole host of other things.

Plus, every student likes trying to smash something apart with a teacher’s permission.

Little hands might pinch themselves handling the strong lever, so it’s good practice to disengage the spring for students while they make their catapults.

Design Challenge Projects

Terrific exercises in STEAM!  And a great way to get into making is to give you and your students a few hours to explore the Making design process. Design challenges are a great way to get this done.

Set a hard time limit, test the devices, take time to evaluate and reflect.

Bridge to Nowhere beginner maker projectBridge to Nowhere

Materials:  Wood craft sticks, hot glue, 5-gallon bucket with weights.

Tools:  Hot glue gun,  diagonal cutters.

Design a bridge to span a foot-long gap and hold as much weight as possible.

An extension could be to build a cantilever — a bridge with only one footing.

Use a set amount of craft sticks or materials in order to encourage creativity in solutions.

Float the Boat

 beginner maker projectFloat the Boat

Materials:  Tinfoil, craft sticks, bamboo skewers, paper, hot glue, clay, wood scraps, pens and markers.

Tools:  Scissors, hot glue guns, craft sticks.

Design a boat that can hold the most cargo, move through the water the fastest, or has the most efficient weight to cargo ratio.

Find the best shape for sails, design the fastest hull and find the balance point.

Egg Drop beginner maker STEM projectEgg Drop

Materials:  Cardboard boxes, packing tape, junk and stuff (the weirder, the better). Think packing materials, fabric scraps, string, rope, plastic bags, etc.

Tools:  Scissors.

Some serious STEM fun!

Throwing eggs off something high always gets kids motivated.

It’s a great way to discuss momentum and illustrate why you should always wear your seat belt!

Beginner Maker projects DIY musical instrumentsInstruments


Materials:  Wood scraps, strings, dried rice, beans, sandpaper, cardboard, cardboard boxes, paper rolls, hot glue, tape, small sections of pipe, etc.

Tools:  Hot glue gun, scissors, hole punch, awl.

If a teacher offers a student the opportunity to make something joyfully noisy, they usually take it.

Homemade, DIY, maker instruments come in all different sizes and types — from wood drums to coffee can shakers, to wind chimes to xylophones, it just takes a bit of a Google search to find great ideas.

Electricity

Once you—parent, teacher, facilitator —get your “legs” for developing and encouraging Maker projects, why not expand your skills?

By now you’ve seen what you and what your kids can do. You’ve probably worked out how to efficiently manage the classroom and supplies, and document learning. Kick it up a level consider some more advanced projects incorporating electricity.

Electromagnetic beginner maker STEM projectElectromagnets



Materials:  Metal bolts, nails, copper wire, batteries.Tools:  Pliers, scissors or wire snips.

Electromagnets illustrate the connection between electricity and magnetism.

In real life, electromagnets are the cornerstone of many common electrical devices, such as door bells, burglar alarms, car doors and electric motors. Students can fiddle with them to create small toys that can pick up ferrous objects.

Squishy Circuits DIY beginner maker projectsSquishy Circuits

Materials:  Battery holder – 4XAA Batteries w/ Switch, (4) AA Batteries, LED – 5mm or 10mm Jumbo, Conductive Dough, Insulating Dough.

Tools:  Hot plate, or stove, and pots, wire snips or scissors.

Squishy circuits are a fun way to learn and explore the basics of electricity and electrical circuits and they solve one of the biggest conundrums with younger Makers: how to build with real electronic components when the young hands have yet to develop the fine motor skills to connect relatively small parts together via grown up tools?

Play dough! Take a piece of flour and a small collection of electronic parts (which you can find online at a low cost.)

You can get all the deets for this project HERE.

banana apple makeymakey DIY beginner maker projectsArduino, Raspberry Pi, MakeyMakey Controller Boards

Materials:

Anything you can get your hands on:   Tinfoil, wires

Tools:  Pliers, scissors, Arduino, Raspberry Pi, MakeyMakey

Once the students have made a few electronic circuits, they might ask for something a bit more complicated.

Give them a programmable microcontroller board, which they can use to play a banana piano, design a custom video game controller or create a dance floor that can play different songs with each tile.

Check out these great microcontroller projects HERE!

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Upcoming MIDAS Courses: June, 2018

The summer weather has finally arrived and there’s nothing like outdoors and sunshine to feed inspiration!  Also feeding inspiration are this month’s lineup of great training opportunities here at the MIDAS Fab Lab.  Don’t let that great idea simmer any longer, it’s time to take action and MIDAS is here to help!

If you’re in need of prototyping, 3D printing and fabrication, the variety of equipment at MIDAS is geared specifically to offer you state-of-the-art resources to create exactly what you need.

Maybe you’ve already got a start using our fabrication equipment and are wanting to take it to the next level?  We’ve got you covered there, too!  Advanced certification courses are also available.

Check out our April calendar of courses and training… we’re sure there’s a course to fit exactly what you’re looking for as you consider your next diy/maker project.

This isn’t all, of course!  Be sure to review the full calendar of all upcoming workshops and courses here at MIDAS.

 

Trotec 120Watt Laser Cutter courses at MIDASTrotec 120 Watt Laser Cutter

June 4th:  The Speedy is the ideal laser engraving machine – no matter if you are starting your own business or want to speed up current production, laser engraving wood, plastic, acrylic, fabrics and many other materials has never been more efficient. This CO2 laser engraver has the highest quality components which ensures minimal maintenance requirements.

Register NOW!

 

 

Shopbot CNC (Desktop & Alpha) Course at MIDASShopbot CNC (Desktop & Alpha)

June 8th:  Training on BOTH the Desktop and Alpha Shopbot CNC included.  The ShopBot Desktop has a bed size of 24″ x 18″ and a 1HP motor.  This ShopBot Alpha is a full-size CNC with a 48″x96″ table with a 4HP motor.  Both machines are run by the same programming software and have full capability to mill 2d and 3d prototypes.
With enough production capability for a three-shift factory, ShopBot PRSalpha tools are tough and sophisticated, gantry-based CNC routers using advanced technology for CNC cutting, drilling, carving and machining.  Tooling and use make this pair of CNCs perfect for soft-material CNC cutting at any size.

Roland MonoFab SRM-20 Mini Milling Machine training at MIDAS

Roland MonoFab SRM-20 Mini Milling Machine

March 26th:  The SRM-20 offers compact size and powerful functionality for production ready, realistic parts and prototypes. A wide range of materials, including modeling wax, chemical wood, foam, acrylic, poly acetate, ABS and PCB’s can be precision milled with this machine at MIDAS.

Register NOW!

 

Not what you’re looking for?  Take a look at our full calendar of upcoming workshops and courses.

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Fun Friday: 20 Day Giveaway – KAST’s 20th Anniversary Contest!

KAST 20th Anniversary giveaway

In honour of 20th Anniversary of the Kootenay Association of Science & Technology (KAST), they, along with the team here at MIDAS thought, what better way to celebrate than to give away some great innovative stuff!

To help KAST celebrate and to enter the giveaway, we ask that you simply like the KAST Facebook page and enter your email (daily!) for the chance to win some great swag.   The perfect opportunity for anyone interested in trying the facilities here at the MIDAS Fab Lab because on the block is a great grand prize pack, which includes a 1 month membership at MIDAS, along with 2 FREE MIDAS courses of your choosing.

There’s other great stuff, too, and all the prizes are completely transferrable so be sure to consider the creative innovator or maker in your family, home, or office and make it happen!

The contest opens today and runs for 20 days, don’t delay!

So, help to celebrate 20 years supporting science, tech, business, startups and all things innovation in the Koots and be sure to visit KAST on Facebook, like us, leave your info each day until mid-June, and increase your chances to win!

Thanks to all and good luck!  Click HERE to enter!

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Upcoming MIDAS Courses: May, 2018

It’s finally spring and the new season is a great opportunity to get inspired and get moving on that great idea you’ve been contemplating all winter! And MIDAS is here to help!

If you’re in need of prototyping, 3D printing and fabrication, the variety of equipment at MIDAS is geared specifically to offer you state-of-the-art resources to create exactly what you need.

Maybe you’ve already got a start using our fabrication equipment and are wanting to take it to the next level?  We’ve got you covered there, too!  Advanced certification courses are also available.

Check out our April calendar of courses and training… we’re sure there’s a course to fit exactly what you’re looking for as you consider your next diy/maker project.

This isn’t all, of course!  Be sure to review the full calendar of all upcoming workshops and courses here at MIDAS.

Shopbot CNC (Desktop & Alpha) Course at MIDASShopbot CNC (Desktop & Alpha)

May 4th:  Training on BOTH the Desktop and Alpha Shopbot CNC included.  The ShopBot Desktop has a bed size of 24″ x 18″ and a 1HP motor.  This ShopBot Alpha is a full-size CNC with a 48″x96″ table with a 4HP motor.  Both machines are run by the same programming software and have full capability to mill 2d and 3d prototypes.
With enough production capability for a three-shift factory, ShopBot PRSalpha tools are tough and sophisticated, gantry-based CNC routers using advanced technology for CNC cutting, drilling, carving and machining.  Tooling and use make this pair of CNCs perfect for soft-material CNC cutting at any size.

Register NOW!

Tormach Metal CNC Mill courses

 

Tormach Metal CNC Mill

May 7th:  The ultimate in 3-axis metal CNC technology. Designed for aluminum, light metals and composite plastics – this machine packs horsepower. This machine is not for beginners – only experienced CNC operators can be certified, but anyone can take the course.

Register NOW!

 

MIDAS and Chicks in the Coop sign making home decor workshop

Chicks in the Coop @ MIDAS – Creative Porch Sign Workshop

May 25th:  Come on out to have some creative fun while learning some basics in sign fabrication.

MIDAS will be hosting Chicks in a Coop for  a 4ft porch sign building class. The Cost is $50 per person, $55 if you want a different layout other than the three in the photo.

No artistic ability required… you will be amazed!

Get more deets HERE.

Register NOW!

Creaform 700 3D Handyscan Scanner courses at MIDASCreaform 700 3D Handyscan Scanner

March 30th:  The Handyscan is AMAZING but don’t take our word for it. Come and see for yourself! This session will demonstrate the handyscan on a number of objects: how to place tags, basic scanning, set up of a receiving software and review of captured online files. (CAD and others on demand). This course DOES NOT cover the manipulation of captured images or printing but is intended to allow members to scan and understand the potential of this device. Recommended for engineers, architects, manufacturers, machinists, makers ad hobbyists alike.

Register NOW!

Not what you’re looking for?  Take a look at our full calendar of upcoming workshops and courses.