MIDAS Course: Trotec 120 Watt Laser Cutter

Tracy Connery Photography - #madeatMIDAS-Trotec 120Watt Laser Cutter

With the advanced Trotec 120Watt Laser Cutter, you can laser cut, etch, and engrave a variety of different materials: wood, metal, glass, leather, acrylic, natural rubber, stone and more.

In addition to the range of materials, there are also a wide variety of applications.  Signage, stamps, toys, promotional materials… the creative possibilities are remarkable!  The laser engraving and marking capability offered by the Trotec makes short work of model making, industrial design, prototyping and just about any kind of DIY application. The possibilites that this laser cutter offers to individuals and businesses is endless and inspiring. Whether it be personal DIY projects or prototyping an idea geared for industry, learning your way around the Trotec arms you with a powerful tool!

MIDAS course: Trotec Laser Cutter

A red laser pointer indicates the location where the laser beam will contact the material. The auto-focus ensures the laser beam is
correctly focused when contacting material. Equipped with a ferromagnetic working platform, making the Trotec ideal for mounting thin materials such as paper or films using magnets to ensure an even, flat surface.

Upcoming course March 19, 2018.  Register HERE to reserve your seat!

Tracy Connery Photography - #madeatMIDAS-Tromac Laser Cutter Course.jpg

Upcoming course March 19, 2018.  Register HERE to reserve your seat!

The Trotec can even engrave cylindrical, conical or spherical objects such as bottles, glasses, balls or mugs. It makes handling your engraving and cutting jobs of any kind fast, accurate and trouble free.

Trotec lasers are the fastest and most productive systems available. The Speedy 300 CO2 offers a top speed of 355cm/ sec. with an acceleration of 5g.

#madeatMIDAS #makersgonnamake

Tracy Connery Photography - #madeatMIDAS-Tromac Laser Cutter Course

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MIDAS Course: Shopbot CNC (Desktop & Alpha)

Tracy Connery Photography - #madeatMIDAS- Starlight Snowboards Shopbot CNC course at MIDAS

Snowboards created using the Shopbot CNC for new company, Starlight Snowboards

The possibilities available to make an incredible range of products, from woodworking to ski & snowboards to musical instruments and so much more are so exciting!

The next Shopbot CNC course is March 9th, 2018.  Register HERE to reserve your seat!

Showbot CNC course at MIDASLooking to revamp your kitchen or shop? Making cabinet components on a CNC router is entirely do-able. Using CNC technology, cabinetmakers are now able to increase production while minimizing material handling.  In addition to high-volume furniture and millwork companies, novice and master craftsmen alike are embracing CNC technology.

Need a sign for your business and want to give it some oomph? Shopbots can be used to carve images in wood and foam, to cut plastic and aluminum letters, and to intricately machine the all sorts of graphic objects and letters. Full 3D cutting capabilities allow cutting and machining of practically anything.

Maybe you’re a water sports enthusiast with a vision of building your dream boat. Boatbuilding is a natural for utilizing the benefits of CNC technology.  In fact, the first ShopBot was developed as a boatbuilder’s tool. In boatbuilding, Shopbot CNCs are used for cutting frames, plywood panels and all manner of interior and exterior parts. They are used in wood, fiberglass and aluminum production processes.

Looking to create your dream guitar?  The Shopbot CNC can supplement your traditional woodworking tools. While the CNC may not duplicate all of the specialized processes involved in instrument making, it can offer new capabilities to assist in bringing your instrument to completion.

Makers of all disciplines:  the Shopbot CNC can be used in many ways for prototyping, reverse engineering and modeling. As a rapid prototyping tool, this equipment can machine foam, wood, plastics and aluminum to efficiently create prototype and reproduction parts. Shopbots are used in large-scale production, from Boeing’s F/A-18 Hornet fighter jet to WoodMode’s custom cabinets.  Production operations from drilling and trimming to more complex milling or machining are easily customized and incorporated into cellular production operations.

CNC stands for computer numerical control and a CNC router only functions connected to a computer equipped with software to direct the tool path of the machine. A power tool router is affixed to the machine that directs its X and Y coordinates as it cuts. Router bits of various shapes and sizes are used for achieving different cutting results.

CNC routers can be used to cut wood, foam, and plastics. Projects include interior and exterior decorations, signage, wood frames, toys, finishing carpentry (cabinets, mouldings), as well as larger objects like furniture, boats, and even houses.

The next Shopbot CNC course is March 9th, 2018.  Register HERE to reserve your seat!

#madeatMIDAS #makersgonnamake

Jonathan Quarrie - SSnowboards created using the Shopbot CNC for his new company designing Starlight Snowboards

Snowboards created using the Shopbot CNC for new company, Starlight Snowboards

 

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MIDAS Training in Grand Forks!

MIDAS courses Grand Forks March 17

We are SO pleased to be taking our training on the road!  First stop:  Grand Forks!

If you’re a maker, innovator, inventor, artist, or hobbyist in the Grand Forks area and want to spend the day learning something new or have a project in mind that requires the specialized equipment provided here at MIDAS, we are bringing our state-of-the-art equipment to you.

Saturday, March 17th, 2018, the team at MIDAS will be offering valuable scanning and 3D printing training.  Check it out!  Here’s what’s upcoming for MIDAS courses and training… we’re sure there’s a course to fit exactly what you’re looking for as you consider your next diy/maker project.


Creaform 700 3D Handyscan Scanner courses at MIDASCreaform 700 3D Handyscan Scanner

9:00AM:  The Handyscan is AMAZING but don’t take our word for it. Come and see for yourself! This session will demonstrate the handyscan on a number of objects: how to place tags, basic scanning, set up of a receiving software and review of captured online files. (CAD and others on demand). This course DOES NOT cover the manipulation of captured images or printing but is intended to allow members to scan and understand the potential of this device. Recommended for engineers, architects, manufacturers, machinists, makers ad hobbyists alike.

Register NOW!

 

ULTIMAKER 2 3D printerUltimaker 2 3D Printer

1:00PM:  The Ultimaker 2 3D printer is easy and reliable, designed for the best experience in 3D printing.   Engineered to perform, this 3D digital printing workhorse is reliable, efficient, and user-friendly and particularly useful for artists, engineers, makers and innovators looking for fast, high quality prints in just about any size or material.

You can learn more and see a few recent projects HERE.

Register NOW!

 

 

WHERE:  Community Futures Boundary, 1647 Central Avenue, Grand Forks

Take only one, or make a day of it as these two pieces of equipment go together like bread and butter!  GET YOUR TICKETS NOW!

Curious about what else we offer at MIDAS?  Take a look at our full calendar of upcoming workshops and courses.

 

 

 

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MIDAS Course: Ultimaker 2 3D Printer

Ultimaker 2 3D Printer Course at MIDAS

The Ultimaker 2 3D printer is easy and reliable, designed for the best experience in 3D printing.   Engineered to perform, this 3D digital printing workhorse is reliable, efficient, and user-friendly and particularly useful for artists, engineers, makers and innovators looking for fast, high quality prints in just about any size or material.

Ultimaker 3D 2 Course at MIDAS

Featuring a .4mm extruder capable of an amazing 20 micron layer resolution, 12 micron XY precision, and 5 micron Z precision, the Ultimaker 2 is the best consumer 3D printer available today.  It has a great compact design, uses standard consumables such as nylon, glass-filled polyamide, epoxy resins, wax, metal filaments and more; and works very quietly with a large print platform for creating relatively large objects in one piece.

Upcoming courses March 2 and April 13, 2018.  Register HERE to reserve your seat!

Pet urns printed with biodegradable PLA plastic on Ultimaker 2 by MIDAS Private Member Gordon Cleland #madeatMIDAS

The Ultimaker 2 uses the fused deposition modeling (FDM) method of mainstream printers that print by melting a plastic filament to create the 3D print. This method is also called fused filament fabrication (FFF).

This 3D printer produces high-quality product preserving excellent detail.  There is a good range of print speed and quality to choose from: quick and low quality, or slow and high quality, as required.  The Ultimaker 2 is a versatile, high-quality 3D printer that can be used for multiple purposes. It can crank out quick, rough prints, or produce smooth, clean prints of excellent quality.

In a nutshell:

  • World class specs. Unmatched with its max print speed of 300mm/s and 20 micron layer resolution.
  • Industry-leading print-to-size ratio. Small footprint, large build volume.
  • Premium materials used in construction. Heated bed smooths prints and allows for ABS printing.

Upcoming courses March 2 and April 13, 2018.  Register HERE to reserve your seat!

Tracy Connery Photography - #madeatMIDAS Ultimaker 2 MIDAS course

Prototype of a cast for a dog’s leg printed on the Ultimaker 2 #madeatMIDAS

 

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#madeatMIDAS: Gordon Cleland

Tracy Connery Photography - #madeatMIDAS Gordon Cleland_01

The team at MIDAS is so proud of the variety of #madeatMIDAS ideas that are brought to reality everyday here at the Fab Lab!

In the past, the process of prototyping an invention or innovation could be cost and time prohibitive, not to mention the challenges of simply finding a manufacturer, often oversees, that might be capable of bringing your idea to life.  Today, a maker space like MIDAS cracks the entire prototyping model wide open allowing for fast and cost effective production onsite, with access to almost half a million dollars in state-of-the-art equipment, in days or weeks rather than the months, perhaps even years, that it used to take.

Several #madeatMIDAS projects have been created by engineers, with a very specific product and result they’re interested in achieving.  However, while we encourage and love our corporate members, we want everyone to know that the MIDAS Fab Lab is open to just about anyone who comes with an idea, the vision and the desire to learn in order to bring it to life.

#madeatMIDAS celebrates the range of creativity and innovation as well as the incredible projects that have been created through the Fab Lab and promotes the maker space as an accessible facility ready to take on just about any kind of project.

A great example is Gordon Cleland, a builder, inventor and artist at heart, who has brought two separate visions to life utilizing all that MIDAS has to offer.

A big do-it-yourselfer, wood, metal and clay were his go-to materials in developing his ideas.  Often, though, he found that the hand-tools he was used to working with were too limited to bring his ideas fully to fruition.  The 3D design and 3D printing training provided at MIDAS were game-changers! Access to this level of new manufacturing technology, and to have it conveniently located nearby in Trail was a huge plus.

When Gordon read one of the early articles about MIDAS, the opportunity to get education and access to new technologies was one he had to take advantage of.  In fact, he made a point of attending the grand opening to learn more!   A member since the opening of MIDAS, he’s taken courses on nearly every machine available at the Fab Lab.  He’s created vinyl signs and wood projects using the CNC router table;  3D scanned and 3D printed prototypes; and, most recently, CNC machined aluminum.

Gordon has enjoyed the accessible membership and training fees as well as the easy access to the amazing talent making up the core of the MIDAS shop. People like MIDAS Lab Director, Brad Pommen, Jason Taylor of Selkirk College, and Chris Kent of Left-of-Center Design provided the skills, knowledge and expertise instrumental to bring Gordon’s visions to reality.

“I also received acceptance for my design into the Venture Acceleration Program, a complimentary group that assisted with market research, legal and engineering.”

It wasn’t long after he began his journey with MIDAS that he made the investment in his own 3D printer, in which he produced a working prototype of his latest project. This allowed him to refine his design before taking the leap, investing in machining a full aluminum version.

Tracy Connery Photography - #madeatMIDAS-January18_91

He looked to the CNC Machining Center at MIDAS to produce the aluminum parts in the finished product.

“By utilizing the machining center at MIDAS I was able to work with designer and machinist Chris Kent as each part was made, helping to ensure our final product worked as intended. It also allowed for a quick turn-around from prototype to finished product at just under 2 weeks.”

His new design adds functionality to an existing piece of equipment used to cut steel pipe. It allows precise adjustment of cut angle, extremely useful when steel pipe is driven into the ground as support pilings. Pipe pilings are used in place of concrete pilings or footings and used extensively in the oil and gas and other industries around the world.

Tracy Connery Photography - #madeatMIDAS-January18_84

Using Gordon’s product reduces the time it takes to cut, level and weld pilings on a job site. As a welder for over 25 years, it’s a product he’d known was in need: a simple and accurate way to cut pilings accurately.

“Now I’ve built one and I’m eager to get it into the hands of tradespeople that can use it.”

Gordon is well aware what would have had to be invested to see this innovation brought to reality without a facility like MIDAS:

“Without the training from MIDAS my only local option to explore the design would have been hire a designer or mechanical engineer to do it for me, and those costs would have been beyond my means. MIDAS and VAP made it possible for me to pursue my idea to a market ready stage economically.”

Have an idea or innovation you’re looking to bring to reality? It can be #madeatMIDAS!

Looking to learn valuable skills?  MIDAS can help!  So many great courses and training to give you the preparation you need to take full advantage of all MIDAS has to offer!

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3D Printed Handheld Raspberry Pi Zero Retro Game Console

Raspberry Pi Zero Handheld Retro Game

If you’re looking for a cool new project that combines the magic of your Raspberry Pi and a 3D digital printer – your own, or of course, ours here at MIDAS – check this out!

This Raspberry Pi Zero finds a new home encased in a 3D printed casing making for a retro gaming console designed specifically for smaller printers and only requiring an 80 x 104 mm print bed size.

The files are actually available to download via Thingyverse and follows the Adafruit PiGRRL Pocket One project with a few modifications, according to its creator.

Here’s ANOTHER handheld Raspberry Pi game console! It was designed to use the Pi Zero and fit smaller printers whilst still being simple to put together. The front and back are completely separate until you close the case, so you can work on one half at a time and keep everything neat.

This build pretty much follows the Adafruit PiGRRL Pocket one, but the image doesn’t work on the Pi Zero (for me anyway) so you’ll have to manually set up the screen and buttons after installing a Retropie image for the Pi Zero. This build does not have any audio.

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#madeAtMIDAS Cory Hein

#madeatMIDAS: Domestic Storage System by Cory Hein

#madeAtMIDAS Cory Hein

MIDAS makes recent advances in manufacturing technology, which includes 3D Printing, accessible to West Kootenay companies, entrepreneurs and students.

This is #madeatMIDAS where we showcase the variety of incredible applications possible with products created here at the MIDAS fabrication lab.

MIDAS supports the expansion and development of local small and medium-sized companies’ strengths in collaborating, adopting technology, and creating new and marketable products while promoting skills training opportunities in digital fabrication and metallurgical technology for entrepreneurs, company personnel and students.

Fernie’s Cory Hein, formerly an Engineer with Teck, has created a novel storage system for homes and condos through the MIDAS Fab Lab.  He’s holding his idea and his prototype close to the vest, but had this to say about his experience with MIDAS.

“My experience at MIDAS was awesome! Brad was extremely helpful with running equipment and training. Having all of the materials there was a huge bonus since I had to travel from Fernie. It was really cool to see that the Tech club was integrated so kids in the area are learning.

It opens up a lot of possibilities for designing my different ideas.”

Bring your idea, big or small, and let MIDAS help you make it come to life!

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#madeatMIDAS: Stereo Speakers by John Lake

MIDAS makes recent advances in manufacturing technology, which includes 3D Printing, accessible to West Kootenay companies, entrepreneurs and students.

This is #madeatMIDAS where we showcase the variety of incredible applications possible with products created here at the MIDAS fabrication lab.

MIDAS supports the expansion and development of local small and medium-sized companies’ strengths in collaborating, adopting technology, and creating new and marketable products while promoting skills training opportunities in digital fabrication and metallurgical technology for entrepreneurs, company personnel and students.

Music enthusiast and maker, John Lake, developed and prototyped his custom speakers – he also builds incredible turntables – through the MIDAS Fab Lab.  A beautiful combination of form, function and exceptional sound quality.

“I’ve been involved with Midas since its inception both as a volunteer and participant.

As a volunteer, I am happy to pass on whatever skills and knowledge I’ve amassed
over my working career but I’m equally pleased to be able to use the Midas equipment
to make my own projects happen.
It’s brilliant to be able to go to a local shop where all types of machines
and tech equipment is available to help a person complete projects that may otherwise be difficult
if not impossible for the average person. Midas has a very important place in our community.”
Bring your idea and let MIDAS help you make it come to life!

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#MadeAtMIDAS weaver Karen Grieves' yarn winder

#madeatMIDAS: Karen Grieves Yarn Winder

#MadeAtMIDAS weaver Karen Grieves' yarn winder

MIDAS makes recent advances in manufacturing technology, which includes 3D Printing, accessible to West Kootenay companies, entrepreneurs and students.

This is #madeatMIDAS where we showcase the variety of incredible applications possible with products created here at the MIDAS fabrication lab.

MIDAS supports the expansion and development of local small and medium-sized companies’ strengths in collaborating, adopting technology, and creating new and marketable products while promoting skills training opportunities in digital fabrication and metallurgical technology for entrepreneurs, company personnel and students.

Weaver, Karen Grieves, was looking for a more efficient way to prepare her yarns for her textile projects.  An avid do-it-yourselfer, Karen was intrigued with the possibilities that MIDAS presented in bringing an idea she’d been tossing around to reality.  With the help of  MIDAS Lab Director, Brad Pommen, she became familiar with new technologies and after much experimentation, Karen found success in her working prototype.

“The meeting was great. Love the interest in my product.  I will be onto the next proto type soon”

Bring your idea and let MIDAS help you make it come to life!

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Wobbler Conveyor Prototype

#madeatMIDAS: I/O Designs Wobbler Conveyor Prototype

#MadeAtMIDAS-IO Designs Wobbler Conveyor Prototype
MIDAS makes recent advances in manufacturing technology, which includes 3D Printing, accessible to West Kootenay companies, entrepreneurs and students.

This is #madeatMIDAS where we showcase the variety of incredible applications possible with products created here at the MIDAS fabrication lab.

MIDAS supports the expansion and development of local small and medium-sized companies’ strengths in collaborating, adopting technology, and creating new and marketable products while promoting skills training opportunities in digital fabrication and metallurgical technology for entrepreneurs, company personnel and students.

I/O Design was presented with a challenging materials handling problem by one of our industrial clients. A flow of process material required lumps to be separated from the dust that forms the majority of the process stream. The existing equipment used was not capable of consistently removing the lumps which would become caught in the screening equipment causing it to block, leading to both process problems and fugitive dust emissions. Any replacement equipment needs to be located in a restricted design envelope between existing equipment and connect to existing screw conveyors and chutework.

After a brainstorming session to identify alternative methods to separate the process stream, I/O Design settled on a wobbler conveyor as a likely candidate for reliable separating the lumps from the dust. To prove the feasibility to our client we utilized the Midas facility to build a full size model from wood. The critical equipment provided by Midas was the Shopbot CNC Router which allowed us to utilize DXF files created during our 3D design process to cut irregular shapes from 4’x8’ sheets of MDF. This allowed a prototype to be built, tested and refined for approximately 10% of the cost of building the actual equipment from steel.

I/O Design was able to build, test and refine the design prior to conducting a live demonstration of the wobbler conveyor to our client. The demonstration and explanation of how the actual equipment will operate provided the client the reassurance required to proceed with the building of the actual equipment.

Bring your idea and let MIDAS help you make it come to life!

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